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6 stats to prove your value as a UX designer

prove your value as a UX designer

6 stats to prove your value as a UX designer. Lifting the veil of what UX Design really is — and why it matters.As UX Designers, we often fall short when it comes to explaining the bigger picture of what we do and why it matters.

Alright, I’ll say it.

It’s about time we learn how to actually speak about UX Design to non-designers and business stakeholders.

As UX Designers, we often fall short when it comes to explaining the bigger picture of what we do and why it matters. When we speak to fellow designers, they get it. prove your value as a UX designer

6 stats to prove your value as a UX designer

They understand the subjectivity of design decisions, the importance of accessibility, empathizing with users, rapid prototyping, and crafting user personas. But when we try to explain these things to non-designers, it comes across a bit hand-wavy and ambiguous.

How to lift the Veil

The subjectivity farse

First of all, we need to get it through our heads for a second that design is an objective and informed practice just like any other field. Look, I get it — we make assumptions and have biases. Sometimes we don’t have time to test everything. But that is true in pretty much all other jobs that are perceived to be “black and white”.

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I used to work in finance, a field as objective as they come. Yet, we had to make assumptions and go with our gut feeling in many situations. In the real world, decisions are pressured by tight deadlines, so they are rarely perfect.

6 stats to prove your value as a UX designer

It turns out your gut feeling was only feed poisoning.

It turns out your gut feeling was only feed poisoning.

6 stats to prove your value as a UX designer
How some people perceive designers

UX Designers work with ambiguity and focus on consumer preferences, which sometimes leads to subjectivity. However, if you’re doing it right, your decisions should still be based on data, observations, or facts. Even when you make a creative decision, you have the ability to test it for effectiveness.

“Subjectivity” bares the negative connotion of being based purely on opinion and not on fact. When you explain design as subjective to a non-designer, they may brush it off as something that doesn’t actually matter all that much.

prove your value as a UX designer

Business people may think:

“If there is no right or wrong in design, then what is the point of your job?”

or

“In that case, can’t I just pick the design I like?”

When you speak to somebody that does not have a designer bone in their body, you need to speak in their language — numbers & business strategy. It’s really hard to argue with numbers. For many right-brained creative people, this is pretty much a nightmare.

Have no fear — I hand selected 6 data driven justifications of why UX matters to business strategy, so you don’t have to.

  1. Returns on investment

$2 to $100 — The estimated returns from every $1 invested in UX.

2. Improving conversion rates

A well-designed user interface could raise a website’s conversion rate by up to 200%, and a better UX design could yield conversion rates up to 400%.

3. Reducing costs

For every dollar spent to resolve a problem during product design, $10 would be spent on the same problem during development, and multiply to $100 or more if the problem had to be solved after the product’s release.

4. Saving business hours

50% — The amount of developers’ time spent on fixing issues that can be avoided.

5. Building company credibility

94% of users cite bad web design as a reason for not trusting some websites.

6. Solving product problems

85% of problems can be solved by testing with users.

I just picked a few of my favorites. There are plenty more!

Those numbers aren’t very wishy washy, are they? This should be enough to convince any business stakeholder to invest in you. Once you have them hooked, you can explain that the right user experience strategy will need a comprehensive look at their specific business.

Products will have different opportunities to improve engagement, conversion, customer loyalty, brand presence, and more. There is no quick answer, which is why they need you to find the opportunities for UX improvements in their products.

How to Use these truths — a Guide

6 stats to prove your value as a UX designer

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Set yourself apart from other job candidates

6 stats to prove your value as a UX designer

The UX job market has become more competitive due to high competition from recent bootcamps and university graduates, as well as hiring freezes and lay-offs caused by COVID-19. Companies are cutting jobs that will cost more than they can bring in.

You need to vouch for yourself and your importance as a designer now more than ever. prove your value as a UX designer

Obtain UX buy-in for new teams or clients

6 stats to prove your value as a UX designer. The pandemic brought with it some good opportunities as well. As business activity moves online due to covid-19, a lot is at stake. Many businesses that did not consider UX before, now have to.

Online market saturation calls for superior online experiences to beat the competition. But it’s up to designers to sell the value of UX design to those that are new to the concept. If there’s not enough jobs out there, let’s create some.

Track business improvements resulting from your work

Once you understand the business impact UX has the potential to have, you can track how you’re doing. Next time you implement a new design decision, see how the conversion rate or time on the page changes. What otherwise detrimental mistakes are you able to catch by doing user interviews?

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Keep track of these things and put them into a presentable format. Next time you have a performance review, present this indisputable information to your manager. This will greatly improve your chances of being recognized, promoted, or given a raise.

6 stats to prove your value as a UX designer

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